Archive for the ‘Editor’s Note’ Category

That Which Divides Us – Editor’s Note

That Which Divides Us – Editor’s Note

The year 2016 will be remembered as one marked by conflict and rupture. Britons voted to leave the European Union in the Brexit referendum, Americans elected Donald Trump in a presidential election characterised by fear and vilification of the “other” and in Hong Kong, localism emerged as an electoral force. These are all signs of […]

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Localisms – Editor’s Note

Localisms – Editor’s Note

Localisms Across the Spectrum Without a doubt, the most eye-catching news of September’s Legislative Council election was the victory of six young non-establishment lawmakers who are not from the pan-democratic camp. Local and international media have broadly described them as “localists” (本土派). Today, most people think of “localists” as those who advocate a separate Hong […]

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Waiting for the Green Leap Forward

Waiting for the Green Leap Forward

Hong Kong experienced its hottest summer last year since Hong Kong Observatory records began in 1884. This January was the wettest since records began and in late January, we were hit by the lowest temperatures since 1955. So it should come as no surprise that the Director of the Hong Kong Observatory Shun Chi-ming maintains […]

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Remaking Our Communities

Remaking Our Communities

In this issue of Varsity, we look at different aspects of “community” in Hong Kong. A community can refer to a group of people living in the same place or being educated or working together, or those who are united by common values, identities or interests. Yet, to many young people in Hong Kong, it seems […]

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Is Hong Kong International, Transparent and Efficient? – Editor’s Note

Is Hong Kong International, Transparent and Efficient? – Editor’s Note

International, transparent and efficient – these are the words the government department for attracting and keeping foreign investment in the city, InvestHK, uses to describe why “Hong Kong is the ideal place to do business in Asia”. They are also characteristics Hongkongers have long been proud to present to visitors to our city. We might […]

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What Next for Hong Kong’s Youth? – Editor’s Note

What Next for Hong Kong’s Youth? – Editor’s Note

As we enter adulthood, we start to taste life’s many different flavours – including the bittersweet. We have to stand on our own two feet, make our own living and stop relying on our families. We become aware of the responsibilities on our shoulders. Some might describe this as a “moment of awakening”, the beginning […]

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Reimagining Public Space – Editor’s Note

Reimagining Public Space – Editor’s Note

Public space is a crucial element of a city’s liveability. In crowded Hong Kong, where land is maximised for commercial and residential use, the importance of public space has been diminished. In this issue, we take a closer look at citizens’ access to and rights in using public space. As the government imposes more restrictions […]

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Civic Awakening – Editor’s Note

Civic Awakening – Editor’s Note

When police cleared, Causeway Bay, the last of the occupied areas, in December, the 79-day Occupy Movement finally drew to a close. The occupation which became known as the Umbrella Movement began in late September and drew together citizens from different walks of life in a push for genuine universal suffrage. As the government did […]

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Information to Opinion

Information to Opinion

Living in a materialistic modern society, we believe our life is constructed by things we can see, hear and touch. Many of us are unaware of the subtle power of information which profoundly influences our mindset and perception, shaping our sense of “reality”. Ironically, thanks to advances in telecommunications and the rise of social media, […]

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Democracy in China’s Shadow

Democracy in China’s Shadow

Just before the autumn term began, the National People’s Congress Standing Committee (NPCSC) announced its framework for the Chief Executive election in 2017. The plan was perhaps even more restrictive than had been expected and crushed the hopes of many Hong Kong people who hope to elect their own leader by universal suffrage. But instead […]

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