Islanders fight Shek Kwu Chau Incinerator Plan

The future of the government's plans to build a multi-billion dollar waste incinerator off Shek Kwu Chau has been thrown into uncertainty after legislators opposed the proposal. Opposition to the plan has been most vocal from green groups and residents on nearby Cheung Chau. But little has been heard from actual inhabitants of Shek Kwu Chau, who would live on the doorstep of the facility.

Plug in and drive on

Vehicle emissions are one of the major causes of air pollution in Hong Kong and the government has been promoting the use of electric vehicles as a way to tackle the problem. But despite its efforts, the response from drivers has been disappointing. Apart from the relatively higher cost of electric cars, motorists tell Varsity the lack of quick chargers is one of the reasons there are so few zero-emissions cars on our roads.

Living with Alzheimer’s Disease

Reporters: Suki Chow, Karen Kwok, Shannon Lam, Oneal Li Alzheimer’s disease, also called senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) and primary degenerative dementia of...

Enclaves – the Struggle over Development

The struggle between development and conservation is being played out in some of Hong Kong's most scenic and ecologically valuable spots - in ecological buffer zones called enclaves. These are plots of private land located inside country parks but excluded from their boundaries. We explain what enclaves are, how they came into being and take a look at some of the controversies surrounding their use.

Hong Kong’s squatter settlements – from transit points to cherished homes

Hong Kong's squatter settlements are an integral part of the territory's history. Since the 1980's, these shantytowns have been steadily demolished to make way for public housing estates, private residential developments and malls. Varsity speaks to residents who are still living in some of the remaining squatter homes. Some are waiting to move to public housing flats. Others, like the villagers of Ma Shi Po view their squatter houses as their home and never want to leave.

Should Buskers be Licensed and Regulated?

Street performers tell Varsity about their thoughts on the current schemes regulating buskers in Hong Kong - would a licensing system help, or would it impose too many limitations?

Getting a Hong Kong Passport, Becoming a Chinese National

When is a local not a local? When the nationality law says they are not Chinese nationals because they are not of Chinese ethnicity. Members of Hong Kong's ethnic minority communities who born and raised here have to apply to become Chinese nationals before they can apply for S.A.R. passports and they say the current system lacks transparency and accountability.
Hong Kong refugee children education

Education for All

Anuj Gurung was born in Hong Kong, so he should have gone to school when he was 6, but he just started this year at the age of 7. This is because he is the son of an asylum-seeker, thus his family had to navigate a maze of red tape to get him to school. NGOs estimate that there are around 500 such children in Hong Kong who would be in the same predicament.

Residents face forced move from Tai O’s Tin Lee House

Tin Lee House in Tai O village is the public housing block with the lowest occupancy rate in Hong Kong, with just 14 households. Now those households, mainly made up of elderly people who lost their former homes in a fire, have been told they must leave because the government wants to sell the flats under the Home Ownership Scheme. Here, the residents tell their stories.

Villages without Water

It's hard to imagine life without tap water in modern, affluent Hong Kong. But for those that live in the 20 plus villages that do not have treated water supply, this is a daily reality. Varsity meets the villagers who are fighting to have this most basic resource in their homes.
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Calling for More Tree Surgeons

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Urban trees are an integral part of Hong Kong’s cityscape but there aren’t enough trained tree experts to manage and take care of them. The government and education sector are trying to change that, but for now working conditions are keeping newcomers away.

The Digital Divide

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Varsity meets two groups of people who are challenged technologically - residents in remote villages and the elderly - to understand their sufferings and hopes.

Dining with Barriers

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Wheelchair users share their experiences of dining out and tell us how well-equiped local restaurants are to serving people with disabilities.