Hardcore K-pop fans in Hong Kong have gone far beyond paying for concert tickets; now they give out souvenirs, ask concert-goers to practice the lyrics of hits, and even order birthday cakes for their idols.

Lion Dance Roars on

Lion-dance gets a 21st century makeover in Hong Kong
Traditional Chinese paper crafts have been used in funeral rites, ancestor worship and temple festivals for centuries. But in Hong Kong, the craft is being kept alive by masters who are branching out into modern uses of this ancient art - breaking taboos to use their skills to make decorations and furnishings.
Imagine living by the beach in Stanley and practising canoeing and windsurfing as part of your school sports activities. This is not just the preserve of the rich and privileged elite, but also for the boys from the Hong Kong Sea School. Students at the school are mainly academically lower-achieving boys from underprivileged backgrounds. The school's maritime-based curriculum and strict discipline are designed to train them jobs in the maritime and hospitality industries.

Saying Goodbye to Lung Mei

Environmentalists and ordinary members of the public have been flocking to Lung Mei Beach before the government implement plans to turn the strip of Tai Po coastline into an artificial swimming beach. As one last-ditch attempt to save the strip, which is abundant with marine life, follows another, people are appreciating the wildlife and saying goodbye, perhaps for one last time.

Temples Get a Makeover

Some of Hong Kong's temples have swapped dark smoky interiors for clean marble, LED lights and airy glass walls. They want to provide a tranquil setting for spiritual reflection but devotees seem to have mixed feelings about worship in these modern shrines.
Kites - inexpensive to buy or make and fun to fly - were once a familiar sight above the rooftops of urban Hong Kong. But as the city's skyline grew higher and regulations to protect air traffic were introduced, they began to disappear from the city's skies. Varsity looks at Hong Kong's kite-flying culture and talks to those who are still holding on to this aspect of our collective memory.
The shipbuilding industry in Hong Kong has long since said goodbye to its golden era. But the city's ship-builders have adapted to the times with a thriving yacht repair business. Varsity looks at the bonds between the shipbuilders, fostered over decades of working together and keeping the business afloat.
The mostly abandoned 400 year-old Hakka village of Lai Chi Wo is about to undergo a transformation with plans to convert derelict village houses into heritage holiday homes.

Cemetery Stories

Hong Kong is a fast-changing city, where malls, residential blocks and entire neighbourhoods seem to transform constantly but there are some corners of the territory that have remained almost unchanged for more than a century. The cemeteries of Happy Valley are an open history book telling the stories of old Hong Kong and the different communities that turned it from a sleepy fishing village into a city on the doorstep of China.