Thanks to its rich natural resources and access to quality shrimps, Tai O has been renowned for its scrumptious shrimp paste. But the ban on trawling has shifted the production line to the Mainland. Varsity asks long-established brands how they see the future of their businesses.
Ko Shing Street in Sheung Wan has been a wholesale centre for Chinese medicine for decades. The street is renowned for its high-quality herbs and dried seafood. But the opening of the West Island Line is pushing up rent. Varsity asks the street's vendors about how they see their future.

Hard To Say Goodbye

Wah Fu Estate, with its ocean views, spectacular sunsets, fresh sea breezes and a Pok Fu Lam address, is not a luxury residential complex but a public housing estate with 18 concrete blocks. When it welcomed its first low-income residents in 1967, the area was a remote backwater. Now with land scarce and housing in short supply, Wah Fu faces what some consider to be long-overdue revelopment. Still, many residents will miss the old days and the ties that bind in this old Hong Kong community.
The shipbuilding industry in Hong Kong has long since said goodbye to its golden era. But the city's ship-builders have adapted to the times with a thriving yacht repair business. Varsity looks at the bonds between the shipbuilders, fostered over decades of working together and keeping the business afloat.
Kites - inexpensive to buy or make and fun to fly - were once a familiar sight above the rooftops of urban Hong Kong. But as the city's skyline grew higher and regulations to protect air traffic were introduced, they began to disappear from the city's skies. Varsity looks at Hong Kong's kite-flying culture and talks to those who are still holding on to this aspect of our collective memory.
Yim Tin Tsai is a village on an island off Sai Kung with a rich Hakka and Catholic history, which was left abandoned for decades. Now, plans are afoot to revive the village and to replace the long neglected salt pans to produce salt, once the mainstay of the village economy.

New Stars of Cantonese Opera

No longer considered a pastime for the elderly, Cantonese Opera is finding a new generation of devotees. Varsity meets the young Cantonese Opera performers who are spearheading the revival of a tradition that has been recognised by UNESCO as an intangible cultural heritage of humanity.
For some, they are like squalid shanty towns. For others, they are rooftop sanctuaries - a home to call one's own. But one thing they share, is that residents of Hong Kong's illegal rooftop huts face an uncertain future in the face of redevelopment and eviction. Varsity captures scenes from life at the top.
Imagine living by the beach in Stanley and practising canoeing and windsurfing as part of your school sports activities. This is not just the preserve of the rich and privileged elite, but also for the boys from the Hong Kong Sea School. Students at the school are mainly academically lower-achieving boys from underprivileged backgrounds. The school's maritime-based curriculum and strict discipline are designed to train them jobs in the maritime and hospitality industries.

Re-living World War II

In our city of skyscrapers, many people might be surprised to learn that many relics from World War II still survive. Without proper heritage protection, many of these historical structures are slowly eroding or being reclaimed by nature. With their deterioration and the passing of veterans who fought in the war, an important part of Hong Kong's history is fading away.

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What they say about Varsity

For 25 years, we have been trying to tell Hong Kong stories that matter. Here is what some of our readers and fellow storytellers...

The Early Days of Varsity Magazine: Remembrances

In 1991, Bryce McIntyre left rural Oregon in the United States for a job at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He was tasked with setting up an English language news practicum. Here, he tells us how his original idea for a student-produced English tabloid newspaper, published four days a week, was rejected and how Varsity magazine was born instead.

Greetings from Cambridge

Cindy Gu was an editor in the 2016 Fall Board. Her reporting for Varsity led to an interest in gender issues and she is now for an M.Phil in Multi-Disciplinary Gender Studies at Cambridge University in the United Kingdom.