Recent Articles

From Hell to Heaven

From Hell to Heaven

Ricky Yeung Sau-churk worked for years as a salaryman, reinvented himself as an edgy artist and found peace and fulfillment as an art teacher in his 40s. He’s retired now, but still contributing to community art and teaching.

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Please Like, Share and Monetise!

Please Like, Share and Monetise!

Being an influencer, also known as a KOL or key opinion leader, seems to be a fun job, but Youtuber So Lok-sin says that behind the glamour, is a lot of hard work. Varsity speaks to different influencers to find out what they do on a daily basis.

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VR technology – a gimmick or the future?

VR technology – a gimmick or the future?

Virtual reality – or VR – has been touted as the future for some time now, and many big-name corporations have invested millions of dollars. Yet VR hasn’t quite taken off as expected. Are we on the cusp of the breakthrough that will make VR seem like a necessity?

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Be Our President

Be Our President

Be our president in The World Council and save our world before the doomsday comes.

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Silver-hair service

Silver-hair service

Gingko House, a social enterprise promoting senior employment, fulfills the seniors’ hopes of a fruitful work life after retirement. Enjoy the unique “5-star delicacies, 5-star service” at Gingko House.

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April 2017 – Information and its Discontents

April 2017 – Information and its Discontents

We live in a post-information revolution age where we are deluged with information and data. How we make sense and make use of this information presents complex challenges. This issue of Varsity explores some of the complex issues around information in our society today.

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Files Not Found

Files Not Found

Despite lobbying from archivists and activists, Hong Kong still doesn’t have an archives law, which means the government can casually destroy documents or fail to keep records of internal communications. When it comes to researching Hong Kong’s history, scholars, journalists and members of the public are forced to rely on Britain’s national archives.

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Not So Open Data

Not So Open Data

Hong Kong currently ranks 37 among 97 countries in the Open Data Index but the city has set ambitious goals to be ‘smarter’. But without legislating for access to information, and without providing data in friendlier fomats, those ambitions will be hard to realise, say open data advocates.

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Watching me, watching you

Watching me, watching you

The government is allowed to intercept and carry out surveillance on private citizens in the name of public security and there are laws to regulate the snooping. However, critics say the regulations are out-of-date in the digital age and existing safeguards are insufficient to protect citizens’ privacy rights.

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Till the Cows Come Home

Till the Cows Come Home

They were abandoned as Hong Kong’s farming industry dwindled. Now Hong Kong’s cows and buffaloes roam the countryside they see as home. Some people see them as a nuisance, others as “indigenous” residents who should be protected.

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