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April 2017 – Information and its Discontents

April 2017 – Information and its Discontents

We live in a post-information revolution age where we are deluged with information and data. How we make sense and make use of this information presents complex challenges. This issue of Varsity explores some of the complex issues around information in our society today.

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Files Not Found

Files Not Found

Despite lobbying from archivists and activists, Hong Kong still doesn’t have an archives law, which means the government can casually destroy documents or fail to keep records of internal communications. When it comes to researching Hong Kong’s history, scholars, journalists and members of the public are forced to rely on Britain’s national archives.

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Not So Open Data

Not So Open Data

Hong Kong currently ranks 37 among 97 countries in the Open Data Index but the city has set ambitious goals to be ‘smarter’. But without legislating for access to information, and without providing data in friendlier fomats, those ambitions will be hard to realise, say open data advocates.

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Watching me, watching you

Watching me, watching you

The government is allowed to intercept and carry out surveillance on private citizens in the name of public security and there are laws to regulate the snooping. However, critics say the regulations are out-of-date in the digital age and existing safeguards are insufficient to protect citizens’ privacy rights.

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Till the Cows Come Home

Till the Cows Come Home

They were abandoned as Hong Kong’s farming industry dwindled. Now Hong Kong’s cows and buffaloes roam the countryside they see as home. Some people see them as a nuisance, others as “indigenous” residents who should be protected.

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20 Years Later – Editor’s Note

20 Years Later – Editor’s Note

This year marks the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover and transition from a British colony to a special administrative region of the People’s Republic of China. Some people will recall the tears of the last governor Chris Patten after he gave his farewell speech at Tamar. But for our generation, such scenes are known […]

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The STEM Paradox

The STEM Paradox

The Hong Kong government is injecting a load of money to promote STEM education, but students seem to be less interested in studying science. Varsity explores the reasons behind.

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At College with Learning Disabilities

At College with Learning Disabilities

More SEN students are pursuing tertiary level education, but the government has no defined policy on integrated education in these institutions. What support do these students need?

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Living with disabled parents

Living with disabled parents

Hong Kong offers support for disabled people, but do little to help their children. Varsity explores the ups and downs of living with disabled parents.

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A Radical Takes Root in the Democratic Party

A Radical Takes Root in the Democratic Party

District Councillor Au Nok-hin once thought working alongside more moderate democrats was like being in a “tug-of-war”, but he’s found his place after seven years in politics.

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