Posts Tagged ‘children’

Education for All

Education for All

Anuj Gurung was born in Hong Kong, so he should have gone to school when he was 6, but he just started this year at the age of 7. This is because he is the son of an asylum-seeker, thus his family had to navigate a maze of red tape to get him to school. NGOs estimate that there are around 500 such children in Hong Kong who would be in the same predicament.

Share

Start Early, Eat Smart

Start Early, Eat Smart

Childhood obesity is a serious problem in Hong Kong, and it’s getting worse. Meet the schools and healthy food advocates trying to stem the tide, as well as one parent who took a part-time job just so she can cook for her kids.

Share

Shall We Play?

Shall We Play?

Children in Hong Kong have to juggle tests, homework, extra-curricular activities…and now some schools have forbidden running and jumping during recess. What happens to children when they don’t get enough time for free play?

Share

Swipe to Learn

Swipe to Learn

The Hong Kong government and some schools are optimistic about e-textbooks being the way of the future. But that’s not going so well. Why?

Share

Bricks without Boundaries

Bricks without Boundaries

Lego has been a popular toy for generations of children. Its manufacturer and fans say the bricks encourage creativity. But more and more Lego products are now theme and even gender specific – some are based on blockbuster entertainment franchises. Does this hinder children’s creativity?

Share

A Call For Speech Professionals

A Call For Speech Professionals

Speech problems and communication disorders can have a devastating impact on a child’s learning, development and personality. With timely professional intervention, these problems can be significantly lessened and even overcome. But as Varsity learns, Hong Kong suffers from an acute shortage of qualified speech therapists and lacks a recognised standard professional accreditation system.

Share

When a Talent is Neglected

When a Talent is Neglected

Parents of Hong Kong’s gifted children fear that without adequate resources to support and nuture their children, the territory’s brightest kids could become underachievers.
By Dora Chiu and Lotus Lau

Share