Posts Tagged ‘disability’

Why It’s So Hard to Train Guide Dogs in Hong Kong

Why It’s So Hard to Train Guide Dogs in Hong Kong

There are fewer than 40 serving guide dogs in the city, or around one guide dog for every 4,300 visually impaired people; the International Guide Dog Federation says ideally there should be one guide dog for every 100. It’s hard to train more partly because existing laws and regulations only acknowledge the use of guide dogs for the visually impaired, not the trainers.

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Invisible Disability

Invisible Disability

End stage renal disease (ESRD) patients need frequent dialysis treatment frequently to stay alive. This makes it hard for them to find jobs to pay for the costly treatment. Disability Allowance could help to ease their financial burden but the ambiguous terms in the application mean many doctors do not consider ESRD patients as eligible for the allowance.

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Misfits Makes Good

Misfits Makes Good

There is a common misunderstanding in Hong Kong that autistic people are either severely intellectually disabled or are geniuses with special talents. Either way, they tend to be labeled as freaks. However, high functioning autistic people are embraced by employers due to their loyalty, methodical approach and sensitivity to numbers.

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Share Your Vision

Share Your Vision

In a digital age where we are linked together by social platforms, Be My Eyes is a mobile app that allows sighted people to help visually impaired people through live video chat. Feel free to lend your eyes!

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When Children Age Quicker than Their Parents

When Children Age Quicker than Their Parents

The intellectually disabled age more quickly than other people. This means they need services aimed at the elderly before they are officially entitled to it. Activists are campaigning to redefine old age for this group, so that they too can enjoy social benefits for the elderly.

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Boccia – A Game with No Barriers

Boccia – A Game with No Barriers

Boccia is a ball game that can be played by the able-bodied, the disabled and the elderly. It’s a paralympic sport in which Hong Kong has an impressive track record. Yet few in Hong Kong have heard of it. Varsity takes a closer look.

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Leading the Way

Leading the Way

Guide dogs for the blind are making a comeback in Hong Kong. Two groups are training a new generation of guide-dogs by enlisting the help of “puppy walkers” who help young dogs learn how to socialise with humans and navigate around the city. Varsity finds out what it takes for a puppy to become a guide dog.

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Wheelchair Athletes Call for Better Sports Facilities

Wheelchair Athletes Call for Better Sports Facilities

Hong Kong’s successful Paralympics athletes are widely lauded by the government and in the media for their inspiring achievements. But little is heard about sporting needs of ordinary disabled people. Here, they tell Varsity about the problems they face in finding venues to train and the hurdles they encounter with the lack of facilities that cater to their needs.

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Running into the Light

Running into the Light

Kim Mok Kim-ming lost his sight as a teenager. But instead of letting his blindness hinder his life, Mok has become a trailblazer for the blind in the fields of information technology, social work and athletics. Next, he plans to take on the 100 kilometre hike, Trailwalker. Varsity catches up with the ‘Fearless Dragon’.

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Singing in Sign

Singing in Sign

Imagine songs with lyrics but without words. Imagine sign language songs. Some advocates of sign language songs think they are a great way to bring the deaf and the hearing together and promote mutual understanding in a fun manner. But reality seems far more complicated. Varsity finds out why.

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