Posts Tagged ‘HK history’

An Independent Life

An Independent Life

Cheung Kuan-tue, 92, looks back on her brief marriage, a war, and decades of domestic service as an amah or “mahjeh” in Guangzhou and Hong Kong.

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Collecting for Posterity

Collecting for Posterity

History is not something we only learn about in textbooks. There are many local enthusiasts who study history through collecting various historical tangibles, such as old maps, revenue stamps and photographs. Varsity meets the collectors, restorers and archivists who can help us understand how the past has shaped our city today.

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The Changing Taste of Tai O Shrimp Paste

The Changing Taste of Tai O Shrimp Paste

Thanks to its rich natural resources and access to quality shrimps, Tai O has been renowned for its scrumptious shrimp paste. But the ban on trawling has shifted the production line to the Mainland. Varsity asks long-established brands how they see the future of their businesses.

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Flavours of Yesteryear

Flavours of Yesteryear

Hong Kong is a city where development constantly changes the physical landscape and where fashions quickly come and go. But Hongkongers are a nostalgic lot. Now, in the heart of our city, there is a restaurant re-creating the demolished Lai Yuen Amusement Park.

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No Retreat for Bar’s Landlady

No Retreat for Bar’s Landlady

From Club 64 to Club 71, Grace Ma Lai-wah has run two bars named after significant political incidents that have witnessed more than a quarter of a century of Hong Kong history. Despite all the struggles and changes in the city and her life, Ma has always managed to find a way to survive.

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Medicine Street Seeks Prescription for Survival

Medicine Street Seeks Prescription for Survival

Ko Shing Street in Sheung Wan has been a wholesale centre for Chinese medicine for decades. The street is renowned for its high-quality herbs and dried seafood. But the opening of the West Island Line is pushing up rent. Varsity asks the street’s vendors about how they see their future.

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Hard To Say Goodbye

Hard To Say Goodbye

Wah Fu Estate, with its ocean views, spectacular sunsets, fresh sea breezes and a Pok Fu Lam address, is not a luxury residential complex but a public housing estate with 18 concrete blocks. When it welcomed its first low-income residents in 1967, the area was a remote backwater. Now with land scarce and housing in short supply, Wah Fu faces what some consider to be long-overdue revelopment. Still, many residents will miss the old days and the ties that bind in this old Hong Kong community.

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Zoroastrians in Hong Kong

Zoroastrians in Hong Kong

Commonly referred to as the “fire-worshipping religion” in Chinese, followers of the ancient Zoroastrian faith have a long and illustrious history in Hong Kong. Yet most Hong Kongers know little about this community of business people and philanthropists whose numbers are falling. Varsity takes a look at Hong Kong’s Parsees.

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The Grounding of Hong Kong’s Kites

The Grounding of Hong Kong’s Kites

Kites – inexpensive to buy or make and fun to fly – were once a familiar sight above the rooftops of urban Hong Kong. But as the city’s skyline grew higher and regulations to protect air traffic were introduced, they began to disappear from the city’s skies. Varsity looks at Hong Kong’s kite-flying culture and talks to those who are still holding on to this aspect of our collective memory.

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Renaissance in Yim Tin Tsai

Renaissance in Yim Tin Tsai

Yim Tin Tsai is a village on an island off Sai Kung with a rich Hakka and Catholic history, which was left abandoned for decades. Now, plans are afoot to revive the village and to replace the long neglected salt pans to produce salt, once the mainstay of the village economy.

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