Posts Tagged ‘occupy central’

Veteran councillor Andrew Cheng is fed up with the district council elections

Veteran councillor Andrew Cheng is fed up with the district council elections

Andrew Cheng Kar-foo served as a district councillor for seven years and a legislator for 17 years. But he says Hong Kong’s elected representatives have little power to change policies due to an unjust political system. At 55 years-old, Cheng says he is too tired and discouraged to run again.

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The People’s Lawyer

The People’s Lawyer

Jeffrey Tam Chun-kit wanted to be a politician so he could help bring democracy to Hong Kong but his mother persuaded him to choose law instead. Now, the Oxford-trained lawyer from a Tuen Mun housing estate is a barrister known for defending pro-democracy causes and activists.

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Finding a Way Forward

Finding a Way Forward

After Jasmine Choi Yan-yan was arrested during the Occupy protests last year, she was denied access to mainland China. The outcome of the protests left some young people feeling powerless, radicalized others, and made yet others think of different ways of bringing about the social changes they want.

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Dr Au Yiu-kai – Always On Call

Dr Au Yiu-kai – Always On Call

Doctor Au Yiu-kai has braved Taliban attacks and Israeli airstrikes during this time as a volunteer physician in conflict and disaster areas across the world. None of these dangers has discouraged him from serving the sick and wounded. But here the head of the Occupy Central with Love and Peace (OCLP) volunteers’ medical team, he tells Varsity about his heartbreak over Hong Kong.

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The Politics of Public Space

The Politics of Public Space

During last year’s Occupy movement, the “reclamation” of Civic Square and the tents, study areas, libraries and art in the occupied sites of Admiralty, Mong Kok and Causeway Bay showed how collective actions could take place within public spaces. While the government tightens restrictions on the use of public space, it seems the public is awakened to the idea of public space as a place to express ideas.

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Information and Disinformation

Information and Disinformation

Activists complain rumours distract and damage movement By Kanis Leung &  Jeffrey Loa Hong Kong is a city with one of the highest smartphone penetration rates in the world, a relatively free-wheeling media and a growing online and alternative media scene. Add to that a large-scale social movement in the shape of the Occupy Movement […]

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Hong Kong after Occupy

Hong Kong after Occupy

More than a month after police teargas at protesters and tens of thousands of people took part in the occupation of areas in Admiralty, Mong Kok and Causeway Bay, the number of occupiers has fallen but many are still holding out to express their demand for what they see as true universal suffrage. Hong Kong’s democratic journey did not begin with the Occupy Movement and it is unlikely to end once the occupiers have left the streets. Varsity asks how that journey will proceed after Occupy.

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Study and Society

Study and Society

After years of being seen as politically apathetic, increasing numbers of Hong Kong’s young people are participating in social movements and doing so at a younger age than in the past. Some have suggested this could be partly due to the introduction of Liberal Studies as a compulsory school subject in 2009. Varsity asks students and teachers what they make of the suggestion and talks to the critics who claim the subject is too political and too biased.

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A Radical Road to Reform

A Radical Road to Reform

For years, Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement has concentrated its efforts on winning office through the ballot box. But more than 15 years since the handover, democratic reform in the city remains stalled. Increasingly, democrats are fed-up with trying to change the system through participating in it. As society debates plans to Occupy Central to, many have already taken their demands and protests out of the Legislative Council and onto the streets, organising campaigns of civil disobedience and seeking more radical means of resistance.

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