Why It’s So Hard to Train Guide Dogs in Hong Kong

There are fewer than 40 serving guide dogs in the city, or around one guide dog for every 4,300 visually impaired people; the International Guide Dog Federation says ideally there should be one guide dog for every 100. It's hard to train more partly because existing laws and regulations only acknowledge the use of guide dogs for the visually impaired, not the trainers.

Old and alone in Hong Kong’s ghost villages

Varsity treks to some of Hong Kong's remote villages to talk to the few elderly villagers still living there and hears that one if their greatest concerns is the lack of convenient transport in the event of a medical emergency.

Getting a Hong Kong Passport, Becoming a Chinese National

When is a local not a local? When the nationality law says they are not Chinese nationals because they are not of Chinese ethnicity. Members of Hong Kong's ethnic minority communities who born and raised here have to apply to become Chinese nationals before they can apply for S.A.R. passports and they say the current system lacks transparency and accountability.

PMI: A Better Choice For Chinese Teachers?

As more and more schools choose to teach Chinese in Putonghua, many local teachers and teachers-to-be fear they will be passed over for teachers who speak Putonghua as their mother tongue. There are signs that some schools would rather hire native Putonghua speakers to teach Chinese even if they have no university training in Chinese language. But should this really be a criterion for picking Chinese teachers?

Calls for Tougher Laws and Animal Police to Stop Animal Abuse in Hong Kong

Editors: Carmen Shih,Cherry Ge    Reporters: Natalie Cheng, Rene Lam, Derek Li Hong Kong lacks animal police and specific treatments for animal abusers In November, a photograph...

Building a City without Walls

Government proposals to import more foreign labour to make up for the shortfall in manpower for the construction industry has sparked fierce debate. But it seems the potential of the local workforce has not been fully utilised. Many of Hong Kong's local ethnic minorities are employed in the construction industry. Yet, discrimination is rife and prospects for career advancement limited by the language barrier.

Salon Culture Brews Taiwan Blend Democracy

Taiwan's cafes and bookstores host to a vibrant salon culture that played an important part in the island's democracy and as Varsity discovers, continues to provide a platform for debate today.

Where Will They Go? To Kwa Wan’s Ethnic Minorities, Repair Shops and Workshops

Redevelopment in To Kwa Wan is affecting many of its residents, including ethnic minorities and small shop owners. Varsity chats with these communities to see how they feel about the changes. Our map feature also show the various areas that are affected by redevelopment.

Wheelchair Athletes Call for Better Sports Facilities

Hong Kong's successful Paralympics athletes are widely lauded by the government and in the media for their inspiring achievements. But little is heard about sporting needs of ordinary disabled people. Here, they tell Varsity about the problems they face in finding venues to train and the hurdles they encounter with the lack of facilities that cater to their needs.

New neutering policy to save thousands of stray dogs

An upcoming pilot scheme to neuter and release stray dogs may save thousands of the animals and help to stamp out illegal neutering operations, say animal welfare groups.

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Too Many International School Places

It is a misconception that Hong Kong doesn’t have enough international school places. In fact, there are too many, says Ruth Benny from Top Schools.

Eating with Caution

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With 8 per cent of Hong Kong children suffering from allergies, many parents avoid giving their kids many types of food. Varsity explores why this may not be a good measure and how some allergy tests available in the market are actually useless.

Telling Hong Kong’s Story

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The mainland Chinese government is in charge of Hong Kong's foreign affairs, but some Hongkongers think their views are not being represented and have taken on "civic diplomacy" to tell the world about Hong Kong, through organising city tours, as well as musical performances and protests abroad.