Periscope March 2018 – Made in Hong Kong Redux

In this issue of Periscope we look at three sectors that used to be known for their 'home-grown' productivity but have declined since their former heydays - agriculture, industry and film. These sectors are supposedly undergoing revivals but we ask if this is really the case and explore the challenges facing revitalisation.

Back on the Farm

In a bid to help promote local agriculture, the government announced a New Agricultural Policy in 2016 and plans to establish a new Agriculture Park in the North District a year later. But local farmers tell Varsity they are not convinced the new policies, which stress intensive farming and new technology, will help them.

Remaking Manufacturing in Hong Kong

Hong Kong used to be known for its manufacturing but most of its factories moved to the Mainland in the 1980s. Now, some are coming back and the government is trying to promote reindustrialisation to diversify the economy. Varsity looks at the challenges facing those who are trying to revive industry in Hong Kong.

Screen Revival

The success of small budget local films such as "Ten Years" and "Mad World" in recent years has led to talk of a possible revival of Hong Kong movies, led by a new generation of independent filmmakers. But is this just wishful thinking in an industry now dominated by Hong Kong-mainland co-productions?

December 2017 – Labour Pains

This issue of Periscope looks at the difficulties workers face in claiming compensation for industrial accidents, at the uphill struggle to improve workplace conditions and get recognition for work-related health problems in the service industry, and at attempts by freelancers and casual workers to form unions.

Our Community

Living with a Stoma

With support and some adjustments, people with stomas can lead full and active lives. but in Hong Kong those who have to use ostomy bags to collect their bodily waste often face ignorance, stigma and financial pressures in their everyday lives.

Workplace Woes

Bullying is rampant in Hong Kong workplaces but as Varsity discovers, it's not recognised by the law, few companies have policies on it and few victims report it.

Stopping Superbugs on the Farm

As the excessive use of antibiotics leads to greater resistance and the spread of so-called superbugs, public health experts have identified the use of the drugs in livestock farming as a major problem. Varsity looks at the situation in Hong Kong.

Accommodating Anchor Children

While some mainland parents with Hong Kong-born children - also known as anchor children - have their kids make the lengthy cross-boundary commute to schools in Hong Kong, others choose to have their kids live here. Varsity takes a look at private fostering services catering to anchor children and agencies that specialise in getting student visas as a pretext for parents to look after their anchor children in Hong Kong.

A Closed Book

Earlier this year, the Ombudsman called the Leisure and Cultural Services Department to task for throwing away hundreds of thousands of books and other printed items from public libraries, instead of donating them. With ever increasing purchases and falling lending rates, is it time to rethink how our public libraries are stocked and run?

Wheelchair Travel Woes

Getting around Hong Kong is easy with its and efficient and widespread public transport network. But for people who use wheelchairs, seemingly straightforward journeys take on additional challenges.



Veggie Food Fears

As more and more people embrace vegetarian diets for health and environmental reasons, food manufacturers have responded by marketing vegetarian food products, including meat analogues. But as Varsity discovers, not all vegetarian food is healthy, especially if it's highly processed.

Rolling with film

Digital cameras began to outsell film cameras in 2003 and nowadays most of us take more photos with our phones than with cameras. However, some young people are rediscovering the magic of analogue shooting in a digital age.

Picking Your Own Food

Hong Kong has abundant wild plants because of its location in a sub-tropical climate zone. This makes it an ideal environment for foraging for food and medicinal plants, but most people have lost the traditional knowledge of how to identify and use the rich natural gifts in our environment.

Photo feature

Traditional Chinese paper crafts have been used in funeral rites, ancestor worship and temple festivals for centuries. But in Hong Kong, the craft is being kept alive by masters who are branching out into modern uses of this ancient art - breaking taboos to use their skills to make decorations and furnishings.


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