Dispatches from Taiwan Dispatches from Taiwan

Dispatches from Taiwan

A small Varsity team went to Taiwan for the Presidential and Legislative Yuan elections earlier this month. They came back with these stories looking at different aspects of the election. The force awakened – the rise of small parties in Taiwan’s politics. Vote as a “Taiwanese”- Even if they are permanent residents, most foreigners in Taiwan cannot vote, regardless […]

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The Force Awakened: Rise of Small Parties in Taiwan’s Politics The Force Awakened: Rise of Small Parties in Taiwan’s Politics

The Force Awakened: Rise of Small Parties in Taiwan’s Politics

From the barricades to the ballots, 2016’s legislative yuan polls became a battlefield for post-sunflower small parties who hoped to make inroads in Taiwan’s politics. By  Thomas Chan, Angel Liu, Frances Sit Taiwan’s political landscape has long been dominated by two main camps, the pan-blues led by the Kuomintang (KMT) and the pan-greens, led by […]

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Vote as a “Taiwanese” Vote as a “Taiwanese”

Vote as a “Taiwanese”

Even if they are permanent residents, most foreigners in Taiwan cannot vote, regardless of how long they have lived on the island. That is because few are willing to give up their original nationality to become citizens in Taiwan, especially when their new citizenship can be taken away if they break the law or violate “morals”. Varsity explores a complex issue few Taiwanese are even aware of – foreigners voting rights.

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Voting for equality in love and the law Voting for equality in love and the law

Voting for equality in love and the law

Then presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen’s public support for same-sex marriage last year turned it into an election issue in the recent polls. Tsai has since been elected as the island’s first woman president but as Varsity learns, resistance and inertia still hinders progress towards marriage equality legislation.

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Multimedia

Education for All

Education for All

Anuj Gurung was born in Hong Kong, so he should have gone to school when he was 6, but he just started this year at the age of 7. This is because he is the son of an asylum-seeker, thus his family had to navigate a maze of red tape to get him to school. NGOs estimate that there are around 500 such children in Hong Kong who would be in the same predicament.

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Jan 4, 2016 10:11

December 2015 - Is Hong Kong International, Transparent and Efficient?

Dec 2015 – Is Hong Kong International, Transparent and Efficient?

Dec 2015 – Is Hong Kong International, Transparent and Efficient?

InvestHK calls our city “International, Transparent and Efficient” when explaining why “Hong Kong is the ideal place to do business in Asia.” In this issue of Varsity, we talk to professionals and InvestHK to see if that is still true. Critics say an influx of Mainland capital and business practices have made our economy more “Mainlandised.” […]

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Dec 14, 2015 12:35

Our Community

Local Meat Disappearing from Hong Kong Tables

Local Meat Disappearing from Hong Kong Tables

Hong Kong’s livestock industry is not only shrinking and lacking in government support; the city doesn’t have enough experienced vets, resulting in a system with “industry outsiders leading the industry insiders.” Can the rise of locally grown food change this?

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Dec 14, 2015 12:46

Photo Story

Made in Hong Kong

Made in Hong Kong

The Chinese Manufacturer’s Association says there are almost no factories still operating in Hong Kong. But some companies remain optimistic that local manufacturing won’t die out and do all their production here.

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Dec 14, 2015 12:38

Recent Articles

Dispatches from Taiwan

Dispatches from Taiwan

A small Varsity team went to Taiwan for the Presidential and Legislative Yuan elections earlier this month. They came back with these stories looking at different aspects of the election. The force awakened – the rise of small parties in Taiwan’s politics. Vote as a “Taiwanese”- Even if they are permanent residents, most foreigners in Taiwan cannot vote, regardless […]

Share

The Force Awakened: Rise of Small Parties in Taiwan’s Politics

The Force Awakened: Rise of Small Parties in Taiwan’s Politics

From the barricades to the ballots, 2016’s legislative yuan polls became a battlefield for post-sunflower small parties who hoped to make inroads in Taiwan’s politics. By  Thomas Chan, Angel Liu, Frances Sit Taiwan’s political landscape has long been dominated by two main camps, the pan-blues led by the Kuomintang (KMT) and the pan-greens, led by […]

Share

Vote as a “Taiwanese”

Vote as a “Taiwanese”

Even if they are permanent residents, most foreigners in Taiwan cannot vote, regardless of how long they have lived on the island. That is because few are willing to give up their original nationality to become citizens in Taiwan, especially when their new citizenship can be taken away if they break the law or violate “morals”. Varsity explores a complex issue few Taiwanese are even aware of – foreigners voting rights.

Share

Voting for equality in love and the law

Voting for equality in love and the law

Then presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen’s public support for same-sex marriage last year turned it into an election issue in the recent polls. Tsai has since been elected as the island’s first woman president but as Varsity learns, resistance and inertia still hinders progress towards marriage equality legislation.

Share

Education for All

Education for All

Anuj Gurung was born in Hong Kong, so he should have gone to school when he was 6, but he just started this year at the age of 7. This is because he is the son of an asylum-seeker, thus his family had to navigate a maze of red tape to get him to school. NGOs estimate that there are around 500 such children in Hong Kong who would be in the same predicament.

Share

To Work or Live?

To Work or Live?

Hong Kong, where busy people work around the clock, came last in a survey on work-life balance in the Asia-Pacific region. According to a 2015 study by the recruitment agency Randstad, over 70 percent of workers felt they were obliged to take work calls even when they are on holiday. Varsity takes a closer look at the difficulties faced by workers in the city as they try to juggle work and life.

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Start Early, Eat Smart

Start Early, Eat Smart

Childhood obesity is a serious problem in Hong Kong, and it’s getting worse. Meet the schools and healthy food advocates trying to stem the tide, as well as one parent who took a part-time job just so she can cook for her kids.

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Hong Kong’s Recycling Business: Recycling More, Earning Less?

Hong Kong’s Recycling Business: Recycling More, Earning Less?

Recycling is not a profitable business in Hong Kong anymore. But landfills are filling up, so the government set up a $1-billion recycling fund this year to try and solve the issue before it gets out of control. We look at how the industry works in Hong Kong, and where it could be improved.

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When Private Turns Public

When Private Turns Public

More and more private museums have opened in Hong Kong in recent years. Unlike public museums, many of them showcase very specific interests. In a tiny place like Hong Kong, you can find museums featuring toys, furniture, camera equipment and even fans.

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Po Toi Island – The Gem in the Rough

Po Toi Island – The Gem in the Rough

Every weekend, tourists descend on the small island of Po Toi off the southern coast of Hong Kong. A tiny population still lives there without water and electricity. Residents, and conservationists consider whether or not the island should be developed, and how much.

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