Posts Tagged ‘mainlanders’

Open Information, Open Minds?

Open Information, Open Minds?

Does free information flow change political opinions of Mainlanders in Hong Kong? by Yan Li & Brian Wong Hui Kei, a 29-year-old freelance writer from Zhejiang was once a Chinese patriot and firm believer in the Communist Party. He was an active member of the Young Pioneers and the Communist Youth League who would naturally […]

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Hong Kong’s ‘Drifting’ Mainlanders

Hong Kong’s ‘Drifting’ Mainlanders

In recent years, the term ‘gang piao’, literally ‘Hong Kong drifters’ has been used to describe the educated young mainlanders who study and then work in Hong Kong. The gang piao identify with and have taken to Hong Kong’s culture, language and values to varying degrees. Some mix only with other gang piao and speak Putonghua, while others have learnt Cantonese and find themselves changed by their Hong Kong experience. Varsity hears some of their stories.

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Winds of Change Sweep through Sheung Shui

Winds of Change Sweep through Sheung Shui

Scenes of locals protesting against parallel traders outside Sheung Shui station caused a stir back in the Autumn and focused attention on complaints that the traders’ activities have changed the character of the town. But as Varsity discovers, even before Sheung Shui became a hub for such trading activity it had already undergone dramatic transformation from a rural backwater into one of Hong Kong’s so-called new towns.

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Hong Kong is Banned Book Paradise

Hong Kong is Banned Book Paradise

In recent years, Hong Kong has become a shopping paradise for people from the mainland. They are eager to snap up genuine brands of everything from milk powder to toiletries and cosmetics. But there is another thing visitors are keen to buy – books that have been censored and banned back home.

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Hong Kong Losing its Sheen for Mainlanders

Hong Kong Losing its Sheen for Mainlanders

The streets of Hong Kong were once seen as paved with gold for new migrants from the mainland. But today’s new arrivals are as likely to be coming here for family reasons as to make a better living. Once, mainland immigrants used to try hard to become Hongkongers by learning Cantonese, imitating locals’ behavior. Now, they stress they are Chinese.

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