Posts Tagged ‘democracy’

Humour out of Chaos

Humour out of Chaos

Hong Kong has a long tradition of poking fun at society through satire; now political satire is everywhere in light of events like Occupy Central and Hong Kong’s fraught relations with China, to the point where a spoof awards show can pack Queen Elizabeth Stadium.

Share

Veteran councillor Andrew Cheng is fed up with the district council elections

Veteran councillor Andrew Cheng is fed up with the district council elections

Andrew Cheng Kar-foo served as a district councillor for seven years and a legislator for 17 years. But he says Hong Kong’s elected representatives have little power to change policies due to an unjust political system. At 55 years-old, Cheng says he is too tired and discouraged to run again.

Share

Finding a Way Forward

Finding a Way Forward

After Jasmine Choi Yan-yan was arrested during the Occupy protests last year, she was denied access to mainland China. The outcome of the protests left some young people feeling powerless, radicalized others, and made yet others think of different ways of bringing about the social changes they want.

Share

Youth March to the Polls

Youth March to the Polls

The Occupy Movement was a large-scale civic awakening for Hong Kong young’s people. In the post-Occupy era, they are seeking ways to preserve the spirit of the movement and spread the concept of democracy to local communities. Some of them consider joining the District Council elections later this year as a way to change the established system.

Share

Open Information, Open Minds?

Open Information, Open Minds?

Does free information flow change political opinions of Mainlanders in Hong Kong? by Yan Li & Brian Wong Hui Kei, a 29-year-old freelance writer from Zhejiang was once a Chinese patriot and firm believer in the Communist Party. He was an active member of the Young Pioneers and the Communist Youth League who would naturally […]

Share

The Pastor of Civic Square

The Pastor of Civic Square

He pitched a tent to protest alongside staff of HKTV, he is suing the government over the closure of Civic Square, he can be seen on the frontline at many of Hong Kong’s social movements. American veteran and pastor Bob Kraft tells Varsity he is always protesting because fighting injustice is the right thing to do.

Share

Hong Kong after Occupy

Hong Kong after Occupy

More than a month after police teargas at protesters and tens of thousands of people took part in the occupation of areas in Admiralty, Mong Kok and Causeway Bay, the number of occupiers has fallen but many are still holding out to express their demand for what they see as true universal suffrage. Hong Kong’s democratic journey did not begin with the Occupy Movement and it is unlikely to end once the occupiers have left the streets. Varsity asks how that journey will proceed after Occupy.

Share

Against all odds: Macau’s democratic awakening

Against all odds: Macau’s democratic awakening

Long famed as a gambling and entertainment paradise, Macau is not exactly known as a place for political activism. Yet, in the past year, thousands of Macanese have taken to the streets to protest against an unpopular government policy, for labour rights and even in support of Hong Kong’s Occupy Movement. Does this herald an awakening of Macau’s civil society?

Share

Today Hong Kong, Tomorrow Taiwan?

Today Hong Kong, Tomorrow Taiwan?

When students in Taiwan occupied the Legislative Yuan – in what became known as the Sunflower Movement – earlier this year to protest against a proposed trade pact with the Mainland, “Today Hong Kong, Tomorrow Taiwan” was a common refrain. Varsity looks at the lessons and insights that activists in the two places gain from looking at developments in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Share

Young Conservatives Break with Tradition

Young Conservatives Break with Tradition

Hong Kong’s young people may be getting more involved in politics and social movements but contrary to common perceptions, they are not all radical or pan-democratic. In fact, some of them are proud to call themselves pro-establishment and conservative although as Varsity discovers, they are not afraid to adopt to learn from some of the more outspoken ways of their pan-democratic counterparts.

Share