Posts Tagged ‘social movements’

Sayed Gouda – The Poet Who Will Not Be Silenced

Sayed Gouda – The Poet Who Will Not Be Silenced

As an exchange student, Egyptian poet Sayed Gouda witnessed the historic Tiananmen Square protests and crackdown of 1989. Now, as a Hong Kong resident, he once again found himself living under Beijing’s shadow after the Umbrella Movement broke out. Gouda talks to Varsity about his unforgettable memories of Beijing and his insights on the Occupy Central Movement.

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Viewing Hong Kong history through protest

Viewing Hong Kong history through protest

While the sheer volume and creativity of the art and visual culture of the recent Umbrella Movement is unprecedented in Hong Kong’s history, the territory does have a history of protest and protest culture. Varsity takes a look at how protest objects and their collection have changed over the years.

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Information and Disinformation

Information and Disinformation

Activists complain rumours distract and damage movement By Kanis Leung &  Jeffrey Loa Hong Kong is a city with one of the highest smartphone penetration rates in the world, a relatively free-wheeling media and a growing online and alternative media scene. Add to that a large-scale social movement in the shape of the Occupy Movement […]

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Hong Kong after Occupy

Hong Kong after Occupy

More than a month after police teargas at protesters and tens of thousands of people took part in the occupation of areas in Admiralty, Mong Kok and Causeway Bay, the number of occupiers has fallen but many are still holding out to express their demand for what they see as true universal suffrage. Hong Kong’s democratic journey did not begin with the Occupy Movement and it is unlikely to end once the occupiers have left the streets. Varsity asks how that journey will proceed after Occupy.

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Against all odds: Macau’s democratic awakening

Against all odds: Macau’s democratic awakening

Long famed as a gambling and entertainment paradise, Macau is not exactly known as a place for political activism. Yet, in the past year, thousands of Macanese have taken to the streets to protest against an unpopular government policy, for labour rights and even in support of Hong Kong’s Occupy Movement. Does this herald an awakening of Macau’s civil society?

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