Archive for April, 2011

April 2011-Hong Kong Identities in Flux

April 2011-Hong Kong Identities in Flux

Hong Kong is a city with a rich history and multiple identities. In this issue of Varsity we take a look at some of these identities and how they have evolved and are evolving over time. Learning Chinese Identity – How is the dominant one-sided national education in Hong Kong affecting students’ sense of Chinese […]

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Hong Kong Losing its Sheen for Mainlanders

Hong Kong Losing its Sheen for Mainlanders

The streets of Hong Kong were once seen as paved with gold for new migrants from the mainland. But today’s new arrivals are as likely to be coming here for family reasons as to make a better living. Once, mainland immigrants used to try hard to become Hongkongers by learning Cantonese, imitating locals’ behavior. Now, they stress they are Chinese.

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Locals Who Are Not Considered Local: Hong Kong’s South Asians

Locals Who Are Not Considered Local: Hong Kong’s South Asians

Many of Hong Kong’s South Asian residents were born and raised here. They have adopted very local styles of living and are unfamiliar with their ancestral countries. But the definition of what constitutes a local held by most Hong Kong Chinese means they remain outsiders.

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Learning Chinese Identity: national education in Hong Kong schools

Learning Chinese Identity: national education in Hong Kong schools

What is national education? Is it teaching students how to salute and raise flags? Should it be producing proud Chinese nationals or critical citizens? Scholars, media representatives and students are concerned that the government’s unequal funding may lead to the the dominance of pro-China, one-sided national education in Hong Kong.

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Stepping down from the podium

Stepping down from the podium

The Hong Kong Athletes Career & Education Programme was set up to help retired athletes further their studies and find jobs. But critics worry the criteria for eligibility are too stringent for most to benefit and only the medallists will qualify.

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Charities pay to receive

Charities pay to receive

For many people, charities should spend all the money they raise to help those in need; fundraisers should be volunteers. The reality is many groups in Hong Kong, and around the world, use part of their donations to hire street fundraisers. Varsity finds out why.

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Let it be, says Singing Doctor

Let it be, says Singing Doctor

Dr David Lee Ka-yan, who shot to fame as the singer of Siu Ming Visits Guangzhou says he doesn’t know how long his time in the spotlight will last. But he is enjoying every minute of it and doesn’t believe in thinking too far ahead. Varsity finds out what makes him tick.

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An Englishman in South Lantau

An Englishman in South Lantau

British engineer Andrew Brown made history as Hong Kong’s first expatriate village representative under the dual-heads electoral system. He’s won three elections since 2003 and has revitalised San Shek Wan village. But Brown faces an obstacle, the indigenous head, Mo. How does he fight against the “feudalism” of traditional New Territories villages?

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Stand up for Laughter

Stand up for Laughter

Hong Kong’s new breed of stand-up comics mine daily life for laughs as they try to tickle the city’s funny bone.

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Touring Hidden Hong Kong

Touring Hidden Hong Kong

Explore the city the city’s culture, history and street life for free. Share meals, chitchats and even secrets with your post-80’s local guides and fellow participants on these alternative tours.

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