Archive for the ‘November 2014-Democracy in China’s Shadow’ Category

November 2014 – Democracy in China’s Shadow

November 2014 – Democracy in China’s Shadow

Protesters have occupied sections of streets in Admiralty, Mong Kok and Causeway Bay to demand free and open elections in the 2017 vote for Chief Executive. Varsity asks protesters, scholars and figures like Occupy Central co-founder Chan Kin-man and LegCo president Tsang Yok-shing about political reform after Occupy. Apart from Hong Kong, we also look at Macau and Taiwan, Chinese societies whose democratic development are affected to varying degrees by their relationship with mainland China.

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Hong Kong after Occupy

Hong Kong after Occupy

More than a month after police teargas at protesters and tens of thousands of people took part in the occupation of areas in Admiralty, Mong Kok and Causeway Bay, the number of occupiers has fallen but many are still holding out to express their demand for what they see as true universal suffrage. Hong Kong’s democratic journey did not begin with the Occupy Movement and it is unlikely to end once the occupiers have left the streets. Varsity asks how that journey will proceed after Occupy.

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Against all odds: Macau’s democratic awakening

Against all odds: Macau’s democratic awakening

Long famed as a gambling and entertainment paradise, Macau is not exactly known as a place for political activism. Yet, in the past year, thousands of Macanese have taken to the streets to protest against an unpopular government policy, for labour rights and even in support of Hong Kong’s Occupy Movement. Does this herald an awakening of Macau’s civil society?

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Today Hong Kong, Tomorrow Taiwan?

Today Hong Kong, Tomorrow Taiwan?

When students in Taiwan occupied the Legislative Yuan – in what became known as the Sunflower Movement – earlier this year to protest against a proposed trade pact with the Mainland, “Today Hong Kong, Tomorrow Taiwan” was a common refrain. Varsity looks at the lessons and insights that activists in the two places gain from looking at developments in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

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