Posts Tagged ‘labour’

The Exploited

The Exploited

The government has been outsourcing public services to cut costs since the 1990s. By 2014, there were almost 60,000 oursourced workers in low-paid jobs such as cleaners and security guards. But as Varsity learns, inadequate protections lead to the widespread abuse of outsourced workers’ rights.

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Suzanne Wu Bows Out to Fight Again

Suzanne Wu Bows Out to Fight Again

Labour party chairwoman and workers’ rights advocate Suzanne Wu Sui-shan says the decision to quit the Legislative Council race in September was “political suicide”. She tells Varsity why she did it anyway and why she’ll run again.

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To Work or Live?

To Work or Live?

Hong Kong, where busy people work around the clock, came last in a survey on work-life balance in the Asia-Pacific region. According to a 2015 study by the recruitment agency Randstad, over 70 percent of workers felt they were obliged to take work calls even when they are on holiday. Varsity takes a closer look at the difficulties faced by workers in the city as they try to juggle work and life.

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Brave New Work

Brave New Work

More and more young people in Hong Kong are freelancing or starting their own businesses rather than working for a company. But the freedom of doing what you love for a living and being your own boss comes with its own set of pitfalls.

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Bargaining for Workers’ Power

Bargaining for Workers’ Power

Unions have been fighting for collective bargaining rights for Hong Kong’s workers for more than a decade. Yet the government and business sector insists that voluntary negotiations are good enough. Labour groups tell Varsity all they want is a fairer footing at the negotiating table.

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Time to be a Dad

Time to be a Dad

Hong Kong lags behind other developed economies in providing paternity leave for new fathers but the government is hoping to set an example by giving male civil servants paid paternity leave. Varsity talks to some fathers about what being home during the first days of the children’s lives means to them.

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