Too Cool for the Olympics

Skateboarding is set to become an official Olympic sport at the Tokyo games in 2020 but skaters are ambivalent about the development - they're worried this will hurt skateboarding's freestyle street culture.
Kites - inexpensive to buy or make and fun to fly - were once a familiar sight above the rooftops of urban Hong Kong. But as the city's skyline grew higher and regulations to protect air traffic were introduced, they began to disappear from the city's skies. Varsity looks at Hong Kong's kite-flying culture and talks to those who are still holding on to this aspect of our collective memory.

Islamic Culture in Hong Kong

Text: Liz Yuen, Gienne Lee and Krizto Chan Photos: Liz Yuen, Samuel Chan, Elizabeth Cheung

Temples Get a Makeover

Some of Hong Kong's temples have swapped dark smoky interiors for clean marble, LED lights and airy glass walls. They want to provide a tranquil setting for spiritual reflection but devotees seem to have mixed feelings about worship in these modern shrines.

Same Same but Different

It seems fun to be a twin, but then there's the endless comparision, and poor families find it hard to support an additional child. Varsity speaks with twins of different ages to hear their stories.
Yim Tin Tsai is a village on an island off Sai Kung with a rich Hakka and Catholic history, which was left abandoned for decades. Now, plans are afoot to revive the village and to replace the long neglected salt pans to produce salt, once the mainstay of the village economy.
Made in Hong Kong local manufacturing industry

Made in Hong Kong

The Chinese Manufacturer's Association says there are almost no factories still operating in Hong Kong. But some companies remain optimistic that local manufacturing won't die out and do all their production here.
For some, they are like squalid shanty towns. For others, they are rooftop sanctuaries - a home to call one's own. But one thing they share, is that residents of Hong Kong's illegal rooftop huts face an uncertain future in the face of redevelopment and eviction. Varsity captures scenes from life at the top.

New Stars of Cantonese Opera

No longer considered a pastime for the elderly, Cantonese Opera is finding a new generation of devotees. Varsity meets the young Cantonese Opera performers who are spearheading the revival of a tradition that has been recognised by UNESCO as an intangible cultural heritage of humanity.
Ko Shing Street in Sheung Wan has been a wholesale centre for Chinese medicine for decades. The street is renowned for its high-quality herbs and dried seafood. But the opening of the West Island Line is pushing up rent. Varsity asks the street's vendors about how they see their future.

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What they say about Varsity

For 25 years, we have been trying to tell Hong Kong stories that matter. Here is what some of our readers and fellow storytellers...

The Early Days of Varsity Magazine: Remembrances

In 1991, Bryce McIntyre left rural Oregon in the United States for a job at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He was tasked with setting up an English language news practicum. Here, he tells us how his original idea for a student-produced English tabloid newspaper, published four days a week, was rejected and how Varsity magazine was born instead.

Greetings from Cambridge

Cindy Gu was an editor in the 2016 Fall Board. Her reporting for Varsity led to an interest in gender issues and she is now for an M.Phil in Multi-Disciplinary Gender Studies at Cambridge University in the United Kingdom.